Risk management in Rapid Linear and Linear PMLC

Projects life cycles face diversified challenges that identify the need for modeled approaches to management. Many models exist and a project manager needs background information into understanding scopes of each model for rational decisions into model selection. Rapid linear project management life cycle model and linear project management life cycle model are examples. Linear project management life cycle model is suitable for projects with known historical background, are short term based and restricted to a single department. Rapid linear project management life cycle model is however preferred for developing new products within short periods. Implementing the Rapid linear project management life cycle model instead of linear project management life cycle model however has associated risks that I seek to explore in this paper.

One of the involved risks in implementing the Rapid linear project management life cycle model instead of the linear project management life cycle model is the possible confusion that may arise from the required extensive documentation. The manager may therefore miss the most important aspects of the management process because of demanded attention by the documentation process and the documented information. Loss of creativity in a project is another risk that is associated with the Rapid Linear PMLC model and arises from the rigid scope of the model that reduces the project manager and project team members to instruments for implementing designed processes rather than creative resources for improving project process and products. The associated complications in disintegrating project functions are another risk of the model and may lead to mistakes and inaccuracies in project implementation (Wysocki 28; Wysocki n.p.).

The model’s swim lane operational approach also identifies risks of ineffectiveness and excessive wastes in event of paralyzed process in one lane. Concurrent implementation of process may also lead to wasted resources is one phase fails. Under the linear model, such a failure would mitigate losses by suspending subsequent processes but such measures may not be possible because other processes in the rapid model will be underway. Reliance on same personnel for operating the different phases of a project, in the rapid model, is another risk factor because personnel may be held up in one department and fails to attend to an emergency in another department. The tight schedule of the model that seeks to complete a project within the shortest time possible also poses the risk of poor management of risks when they occur. While a risk may be realized in one phase of a project, the need to complete the phase activities and incorporate products into other phases for finalization may force forwarding of the risk and this may have greater impacts on the overall project. This is contrary to the scope of linear method that allows time for managing the risk before subsequent processes (Wysocki n.p; Wysocki n.p.).

Specific mitigation measures can however be implemented to manage the model’s susceptibility to the identified risks. The risk of heavy documentation into confusion and diverted attention can be mitigated by organizing the information and channeling them to different parties as opposed to concentrating them to one office. This will reduce impacts of information overload and facilitate focus on the project. The scope of the model can also be changed to allow for more freedom into creativity. Highly qualified personnel should be used in the model to ensure efficiency and sufficient number of personnel be deployed in each phase or department of a project.

Works cited

  • Wysocki, Robert. Adaptive project framework: Managing complexity in the face of uncertainty. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2010. Print.
  • Wysocki, Robert. Effective project management: Traditional, agile extreme. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2011. Print.
  • Wysocki, Robert. Executive’s guide to project management: Organizational processes and practices for supporting complex projects. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2011. Print.
  • Wysocki, Robert. The business analyst/project manager: Anew partnership for managing complexity and uncertainty. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2010. Print.

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